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International Classroom Workshop: Institutional Recommendations and Teaching Tips

On Friday, Feb. 1, about 45 members of the faculty, GTFs, and administrators met for the International Classroom, a panel and workshop about the teaching implications of the near doubling of UO international student numbers in just five years. “I thought the enthusiasm and reception were excellent—I’m convinced we need to hold these events regularly,” said […]

UO Welcomes Largest Ever International Cohort

In Fall 2012, the University of Oregon welcomed 2,550 international students, its largest group ever—almost double the size of its 2007 international class. These students represent more than 80 countries, but the lion’s share—just over half—are from China. Korea, Japan, Taiwan, and Saudi Arabia round out the top five home nations; combined, they account for about […]

Getting Students to Think Critically

As part of my job here in the Teaching Effectiveness Program, I help facilitate the Science Literacy Teaching Journal Club in partnership with the University of Oregon’s Science Literacy Program (SLP).  The SLP’s goal is to improve the general population’s science literacy by specifically addressing the topic in a variety of 100-level science courses.  In […]

TEATalks: ESRI, ArcGIS and “Our Digital Earth” By Professor Chris Bone

Professor Chris Bone from the Geography Department was our guest presenter at last Friday’s TEA Talks. He gave a very detailed demonstration on Geographic Information Systems, how the science of geography has changed over time, and then he showed us the up and coming tool created by ESRI (the maker of the software ArcGIS) known […]

TEATalks: Collaborative Applications and Collaborative Learning

In our second TEATalks meeting we focused on collaborative applications and learning.   The main area we explored was the idea of using technologies like Google Docs, word processing documents, and wikis for creating collaborative learning spaces for students. We hope to continue this collaborative learning discussion through all of our future sessions.   As part of this […]

Plagiarism: Strategies for Prevention

This is part two of a two-part article. In part one, I presented a brief overview of the problem. This week I discuss a few potential strategies for preventing plagiarism. As noted in part one, statements about academic misconduct on course syllabi are not very effective in preventing plagiarism.  In effect, they function like an End-User […]

Plagiarism: The Problem

This is the first part of an article on plagiarism and what to do about it. This week I present the problem; next week I’ll discuss some strategies to address it. It is the end of another term, and that means keyboards and printers will be working double time to churn out term papers and […]

Learning and Metacognition

A primary goal of university teaching is to help students learn how to engage with the content around which courses, degrees, and entire disciplines or fields of inquiry are organized. To “pass” a course, “earn” a degree, or “gain entry” into a community of scholars, students must demonstrate a certain level of mastery of knowledge […]

Online Teaching Resources for Instructors

Sometimes I’m asked if there is an easy way to stay informed about the latest research on teaching and learning – without having to find and wade through actual books or articles. Usually this request is coupled with a caveat that one is looking for information that is also practical, that is, techniques and activities […]

Whither Research?

This is the second of two posts engaging the question of the future of research and teaching in higher education. Part Two: Opportunities Last week, in part one, I introduced two trends that pose serious challenges to the future of research in higher education: student are struggling with learning basic research skills and libraries are struggling […]